footnoting e-sword resource

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pakman
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Hi all,

this is not really a technical question. but i'm using E-sword in writing some of my papers for seminary. and i was wondering how i could footnote or cite the sources from e-sword?

Should I be consulting Turabian first? but i was wondering maybe some of you might have experience with this and can give me a quick answer...thanks.

God bless.

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Icenian
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Re: footnoting e-sword resource

Pakman,

In the absence of a prescibed style guide, here is a method I would suggest:

Element 1 – Author: If you know the author's name of a text or article you are citing, list the last name first, followed by a comma (,), then the first name or initials followed by a comma (,). If the text or article you cite is not signed (if you do not know the author's name), list the title first (skip to Element 4 below).

Element 2 – Letters/Academic Achievement: If the author has been granted letters or has earned academic degrees, list the abbreviated notation (e.g., Rev. D.D., Ph.D., Th.M., etc.,) followed by a comma (,)

Element 3 – Special Notations: If the text or article lists the author as the editor or translator, list the abbreviated notation (i.e., ed., trans., etc.,) followed by a comma (,)

Element 4 – Title: List the title in italics followed by a comma (,)

Element 5 – Place of publication. List the city followed by a comma (,) and then the state using the capitalized two-letter format followed by a colon (:).

Element 6 – Publisher: List the name of the publisher (or URL owner) followed by a comma (,)

Element 7 Date of Publication. List the date of publication (for printed books, list only the year. For periodicals, list the day, week, or month and year as applicable) followed by a comma (,)

Element 8 – Page Reference: For printed works list the page number. For a single page reference use the style of “p. x” and for multiple page reference use the style of “pp. xx-xx”.

Or for internet resources:

Element 7 – URL: If the cited work is an internet e-reference, list the uniform resource locator (URL), followed by a comma (,)

Element 8 – URL Reference Date. For cited works drawn from the internet, type the word “Accessed” followed by the Month (use the first three letters of the month), followed by the four digit year.

Or for software library resources:

Element 7 – Title of Software, followed by a comma (,) Version of software, followed by a comma (,) Resource type, i.e. Bible, Commentary, Dictionary, Topic or Step, followed by a comma (,)

Element 8 – Page, chapter, verse, word, or Strong's number reference

Examples using e-Sword as a source:

Edersheim, Alfred, The Temple - Its Ministry and Service, e-Sword, Ver. 9, Topic, ch. 2

Thayer, Joseph, H, Thayer’s Greek Definitions, e-Sword, Ver. 9, Dictionary, G3056

Strong, James, S.T.D., LL.D., Strong’s Hebrew and Greek Dictionaries, e-Sword, Ver. 9, Dictionary, H430

Note that Strong’s academic letters are included, whereas Thayer’s are not, this is based on the data provided in the e-Sword resource’s information page.

Young, J.N., Young's Literal Translation of the Holy Bible, e-Sword, Ver. 9, Bible, 2Timothy 3:16

The key is to supply as many of the elements as possible without attributing assumed data.

God Bless!
Eric

admin
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Re: footnoting e-sword resource

pakman wrote:
i was wondering how i could footnote or cite the sources from e-sword?

 
Cross check your  quotes with a hard copy,  and use the bibliographic data for the hard copy.  
 
For material that  you only use as reference, but don't cite,  state that you used the e-Sword resource as your source.
_Baptist Confession of Faith of 1689_ Particular Baptists 1677.   e-Sword Topical File: np: nd
 
Eventually, the user created resources that are distributed from here (e-sword-users.org) will  contain the meta data table and  copyright table.   Both of those will make it much easier to provide an  accurate bibliogrpahic citaiton for your Seminary papers.
 
Quote:
Should I be consulting Turabian first?

 
Is Turabian the style manual that the Seminary  uses?
I have about  twenty  style manuals, but never bothered getting Turabian,  because it wasn't used.
 
jonathon

pakman
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Re: footnoting e-sword resource

thank you this is exactly what i needed

meek75
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Re: footnoting e-sword resource

Hi,

"double check the hard copies" seems to take away a huge part of te benifit of using bible software. It assumes I have access to the hard copies -- which in many cases I don't. Espeially when it comes to books I purchase for e-sword "check the hard copies" means I need to purchase them twice!

bible.study.software
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Re: footnoting e-sword resource

meek75 wrote:
"double check the hard copies" seems to take away a huge part of the benefit of using bible software.

There is a very simple reason for checking your quotes against the hard copy. The e-text may not accurately represent the content of the original hard copy.

Sometimes the gaffes in the resources are obvious. For example,the Spanish language Bible resource that gave Deuteronomy 100 chapters. Other times they aren't obvious. For example, the Spanish/Hebrew resource that randomly lists the Ketiv reading as the Qere reading, and the Qere reading as the Ketiv reading.

A safe assumption is that _every_ Spanish Language resource that meets e-Sword Resource Format Specification 1, or lower is neither the text it purports to be, nor an accurate representation of the text that it was copied from. (You can count the exceptions on one hand, and have several fingers left over.)

Take a simple English language resource: TSK. Which edition of TSK is it? It isn't the first edition, because it contains content that isn't in that edition. But it isn't the second edition, because it lacks content that that edition contains.

I realize that this might put a damper on your enthusiasm to use Bible Study Software. Realize this quality control, or lack of it, isn't confined to e-Sword. (The Libronix version of the 1901 Reina-Valera has roughly 1,000 errors, when compared to the hard copy that the Spanish e-Sword Resource Creation Team used to validate the text. However, Libronix' edition conforms perfectly with the hard copy distributed by the publisher that provided the digital copy to them.[And yes, I know that the hard copy Reina-Valera has a plethora of issues. Those issues really serve to demonstrate that both the providence of the etext, and accurate bibliographic data about the hard copy should be mandatory for every e-Sword resource.)

Back around 2005, somebody --- I've forgotten who --- seriously proposed that one study the evolution of digital text families. That one can tell which publisher copied which text from whom, by the errors that the text contains.

jonathon

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Doctordavet
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Re: footnoting e-sword resource

Hey, Meek,

The purpose of footnoting is to inform of your source; it is not to verify the accuracy of your source. Here is a quote from Kate Turabian:

    Footnotes have four main uses: (a) to cite the authority for statements in text - specific facts or opinions as well as exact quotations; (b) to make cross-references; (c) to make incidental comments upon, to amplify or to qualify textual discussion - in short, to provide a place for material which the writer thinks worthwhile to include but which he feels would disrupt the flow of thought if introduced into the text; (d) to make acknowledgments. (1)

If I were teaching a college course, here is how I would require footnotes from e-Sword resources:

  1. List the author & the module creator (if available)
  2. List the title of the particular e-Sword resource ("Albert Barnes' Notes on the Bible," or "Bridgeway Bible Dictionary," etc.
  3. Enter as much of the "information" from the source as is included in e-Sword (go to "Commentary/Information..." or "Dictionary/Information..." etc. For .topx modules, look within the module itself for this information
  4. Since the vast majority of e-Sword resource material has removed all page numbering, cite the location otherwise (by commentary - use Scripture reference; by dictionary - use entry)
  5. Note the version of e-Sword being used (9.5.1, 8.0.6, 7.9.8, etc.)

IMPORTANT NOTE: Check with your teacher BEFORE you start research!

Here are a couple of examples of how I would format a footnote:

    Albert Barnes, Albert Barnes' Notes on the Bible. Referenced from Acts 2:2. e-Sword 9.5.1.

    G. Campbell Morgan (module created by Pamela Marshall), The Acts of The Apostles. (Originally New York, Chicago, London and Edinburgh: Fleming H. Revell Company, 1924), cited in "Acts Chapter 2." e-Sword 9.0.3.

Ultimately, of course, you'll need to clear this with your teacher; but if you perhaps suggest this approach to a teacher, he/she may accept your suggestion. Your attitude and approach may make all of the difference, by the way (Prov 15:1)....

(1) Kate Turabian, A Manual for Writers of Term Papers, Theses, and Dissertations, 4th Edition. (Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1937, 1955, 1967, 1973), p. 78.

Dr. David S. Thomason
Ph.D

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bible.study.software
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Re: footnoting e-sword resource

Doctordavet wrote:

The purpose of footnoting is to inform of your source; it is not to verify the accuracy of your source.

If you cite something from the e-Sword version of, say. Barnes, that isn't in the hard copy that your instructor uses, your grade will suffer, because it will appear that you are simply making up references.

Even with semi-obscure works, such as _Glossa Ordinaire_, it isn't out of the question that the instructor doesn't have the digital version. There are roughly two million books available in digital format, for gratis. Most of them are of older, public domain works --- IOW, the type of content that comprises most of the resources for e-Sword.

jonathon

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Doctordavet
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Re: footnoting e-sword resource

Jonathon,

You've moved into a different question. The question is not, "Are e-Sword resources sufficient for college level research?" The question is, "How do you footnote from e-Sword?"

You've raised some very valid points about careless transference of text into e-Sword; something we all should be very concerned about (after all - I want to know what the Bible says; not what some well intentioned .bblx converter meant it to say). If someone has a book available, citations should come from it.

But if e-Sword is all we have; and if it is an acceptable resource; and the teacher OKs the format; quote and refer as oft as necessary. And then make sure you footnote it accordingly.

Dave

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